new york state routes
new york state routes
Get

new york state routes 2011-2019

Get Form

Video instructions and help with filling out and completing new york state routes

Instructions and Help about new york state routes

Trooper joel r Davis New York State Police and of watch July 9th 2017 cause of death gunfire from the New York State Police at approximately 8 o 9 p.m. on Sunday July 9th trooper Davis responded to a call of shots fired during a domestic dispute into town Teresa in Jefferson County New York while approaching the residence trooper Davis was shot once and killed the suspect 32 year old Justin D Walters surrendered to other state troopers without incident walters is an active duty Army infantryman who stationed at Fort Drum Walters wife 27 year old Nicole V Walters was also found deceased at the scene trooper Davis of Evans Mills New York was 36 years old he was a four year veteran of the New York State Police he is survived by his wife and three children trooper Joel Davis's service and sacrifice will never be forgotten by his family friends brothers and sisters of the New York State Police

FAQ

How does the quality of life compare between London and New York City?
I've lived in both cities. Really depends what you want. New York is a city that you immediately fall for. London is an affection that grows steadily on you over time.New York is more fast-paced and far more dense. It's more obvious exactly what is open late until 4 a.m. and what isn't. The city has an energy that stretches the limits of how long you think it is possible for a human being to be awake.  Public transportation is very, very cheap and it's fast to get from one side of the city to the other. On average, if you were to pick a random restaurant, I think the food is better. London is more like a collection of villages that have grown into each other over 1,000 years. It's lower density and I believe it takes longer to get from one side of the city to another. The Tube only runs until 12:30 or 1 a.m. (But the really edgy part of London -- Hackney & Dalston -- is only a short bus ride or maybe even walking distance from the financial center if you're liberal about what you consider its boundaries. Lower Manhattan, while extraordinarily fun to live in, is over-commercialized. The unique little shops and curiosities that made it an unusual place to live increasingly feel more like a vestige of the past to me there. Chains are kinda taking over.)  I personally think the artistic culture is far less commercial and much more innovative in London than New York. The Arts Council supports all kinds of local, eccentric and home-grown projects. Fashion is quirkier and more original. Alexander McQueen, I think, could have really only come from the U.K. and Central St. Martins. New York's designers and artists think about what will sell. London's artists think about what is conceptually new, even if it is difficult and considered unattractive now.London is also a more international city than New York. (I say this somewhat controversially). While about one-third of Londoners and New Yorkers are foreign born, America encourages more of a hyphenated sense of identity. People are Mexican-American, or Ethopian-American, or Chinese-American. In that sense, while New York may be international, the U.S.'s comparatively prohibitive immigration policies mean people try to stay in the country for a longer period of time and become more assimilated than they do in London, where dozens of other countries are literally an hour's flight away.  Travel, of course, is a major plus in London. You can you get away for ~$100 to Andalusia, Morocco, Turkey, Berlin, Milan, Rome, etc. Travel is deeply ingrained into the culture and Londoners now legally have five weeks of holiday a year.London's food culture is improving, but you really have to know where to go and when. Over the past several years, Brits have come to embrace and elevate their own cuisine and local produce. I love the different mix of international cuisines there too. Growing up in California meant I considered Italian, Mexican and Chinese to be the great trinity of foreign cuisine. In Britain, chicken tikka masala and the Turkish kebab rule. Sunday roasts also seem to be the functional equivalent of the Manhattan brunch. One of my favorite things to do in London was get lost in the Sunday markets -- Broadway Market, Upmarket, Borough Market, Brixton -- really, any of them. There are hundreds of stands where you can find the best hog roast, cheese brought in overnight from France, nduja from Calabria, octopus balls, banh mi, spanakopita, curry, Ghanaian stew, bizarre T-shirts or whatever. If you want to stay out very, very late, you also have to know where to go. Most places close down around 1 or so. The drinking culture is also far more onerous on your liver. A week of Manhattan drinking is more distributed. It might involve cocktails and wine on several nights, with some extra drinking on weekends. A week of London drinking and the culture of buying rounds -- where everyone is expected to buy a round of drinks for everyone else -- means you end up drinking WAY more than you should. If I went out drinking with a group of eight people, all eight people would end up buying drinks for everyone else. And then I would buy eight drinks for everyone (which is way more than I would ever pay for in the U.S. being a small-ish woman).If you're American, it's much easier to find a social circle in New York. Americans are just much more open to loose and sudden friendships. With Brits, you have to know them for at least a couple months until they feel really comfortable with you. You can apply this same line of thinking to dating -- except when Londoners go on the lash, which is probably the only time some Brits feel truly comfortable with themselves. (Just teasing!) In New York, the upside and the downside of dating is the paradox of choice. Enough said there. There are entire TV shows, movies and books devoted to this problem. Almost every New Yorker will tell you that they love the city and would have a hard time living anywhere else in the world. Virtually no Londoner will tell you the same thing about London. They will moan about the weather and reminisce about their holiday in Phuket, Ibiza, etc. Don't mistake this for misery (most of the time). Brits and Americans just have different ways of expressing themselves. Londoners find our flagrant use of "Amazing!" "Awesome!" and "Love!" as tiring and insincere as we find their lack of eye contact and smiling (amongst strangers) cold and dispassionate. Also, talking about what your job is or asking the requisite "What do you do in the city?" question immediately is a faux pas in London.  The vulgarity of that question also probably has a little to do with how Britain is a class-based society where a person's stature in life should be readily apparent through their accent, demeanor and dress to other Brits. This isn't the case in the U.S. so Americans tend to probe more, especially in New York, where a person's career is a major -- if not the most important -- part of their identity. Then of course, there's the cliche that Americans live to work, while continental Europeans work to live. The British tend to be somewhere in between those extremes. In Britain, frivolous banter is a high art. Talking about nothing can be a way to probe a person's intelligence, wit and creativity.I can't really compare costs at this point since the pound is so weak. When I lived in London, GBP-USD ranged from ~$1.40 to $2.10. When the pound was hovering near its peak, the daily costs of living were extraordinarily high, but rent took up a comparatively smaller share of my monthly income than it did in New York. Health care is also free (er, nationalized) in the U.K. I can't speak for older people who are likely to have more serious health problems, but for a younger person in good health, this was awesome. No having to stress about what's covered and what's not, figure out who is a provider and who is not, be shocked by unanticipated co-pays that were not listed in the original health plan marketing material, be sent random $200 or 300 bills for a routine annual when your doctor for whatever reason can't bill your health insurance provider, have expensive, unnecessary tests or consultations pushed upon you, worry when you're in between jobs, or re-figure everything out again when you change jobs or your company gets acquired. Also, the very best essay I have ever read about the experience of a young person in New York was written by Joan Didion: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~zkurmu...
How do I start an import/export LLC in New York City?
Years ago forming an LLC was a huge pain. You had to Google your secretary of state, navigate their horrendous websites to find the right forms, print them, fill them in, and mail it with a check all while praying that everything was done adequately. The alternative route was finding a lawyer to do it for you for $1500-$2000.Now, creating an LLC is much cheaper to set up in New York, but still a little burdensome. You just need to submit the right registration form (DOS-1336), abide by the publication requirements, and pay the pertinent fees associated with formation. However, New York is unique in that it also requires an operating agreement which delineates the rules/responsibilities of the members (even if you're just a single member LLC). Even if it's only you involved with the business, you should ideally sit with a lawyer and draft up the rights, duties, liabilities, and obligations particular to the LLC. Keep in mind that you don't have to file this with the Department of State as it is meant to be kept internally.Anyways, if you're looking for affordable price quotes to get your LLC done from an experienced group of startup lawyers then check out LawTrades. We use technology to make our legal services more cost-effective than traditional law firms. Our site offers free initial consults & a money-back guarantee.
Why did Hillary Clinton fail the D.C. bar exam? What percentage of Yale students fail the D.C. Bar Exam? Did the test decrease in difficultly since Hillary took it? Does the exam test knowledge of The U.S. Constitution?
Bar exams are not easy. Although they’re not the impossible challenges that some lawyers like to claim (the equivalent of “walking uphill in snow to school every day” stories), it’s definitely true that anyone, including graduates of the nation’s best law schools and people who will go on to have exceptional legal careers, can fail once. (People who fail multiple times are a different matter.) This is because the bar exam requires the test taker to demonstrate a wide knowledge of the law (including subjects that most people do not study in law school) and apply these diverse legal principles correctly. An otherwise intelligent student who does not put in a sufficient amount of preparation (or does not prepare the right way) is going to have a difficult time, because it’s impossible to “b.s.” your way out of the bar exam in the same way you might write a long, flowery essay that says nothing in high school or college and still get a passing grade. If you don’t know a sufficient number of tested legal concepts and how to apply them, there’s no escape, and you’re going to fail.Even though it sometimes seems like everyone in D.C. is a lawyer, only a few hundred people take the D.C. bar exam each year, compared to thousands in states like New York, California, and Texas. This is because, generally speaking, a member of any other American state bar in good standing is allowed to “waive in” to D.C., that is, complete an application, pay a fee, and thereby become a member of the D.C. bar without examination. As a result, most lawyers who want to practice in D.C. tend to take the bar exam of another state first, and then go the application route. I, for example, passed the summer 2005 New York bar exam and then I filled out paperwork for D.C. in 2006. Another reason people avoid the D.C. exam is because it is tough, both in content and pass rate: pass rates for first-time test-takers are often materially below other jurisdictions, and are definitely not 75% (which is the rough average for first-time takers in all states). Therefore, only those who are convinced that D.C. is the one jurisdiction they’re going to practice in and the small percentage of lawyers who cannot waive in to D.C. wind up taking its bar exam. Given that D.C. was the first bar Clinton sat for, it’s safe to say she was in the former category.So what happened to Hillary Clinton? I suspect that her story is far from unique, and is shared by many other people who failed the bar the first time out but passed the next time: either (1) she didn’t sufficiently prepare for the bar exam because she assumed, by virtue of her being a smart Yale Law grad, that she could wing it, (2) she studied for the bar, but not in a way that increased her chances of success (the DIY approach is often a recipe for failure), (3) she was going through a difficult time leading up to the exam and was not focused on the bar, (4) she psyched herself out while taking the exam, and/or (5) she did not manage her time well during the exam, and therefore didn’t complete questions/essays, losing lots of points in the process. These are pretty much the standard explanations as to why someone who should pass the bar nonetheless winds up failing.As to the other questions:I don’t know that there are enough Yalies taking the D.C. bar for there to be a meaningful sample for a pass rate. Let’s assume Jane Smith from Ohio attended Yale Law and wants to practice in D.C. She’s almost certain to take another state’s bar exam—options for Smith might include Maryland or Virginia (jurisdictions adjacent to D.C.), New York or California (huge legal markets and also bars that most of Smith’s classmates will be studying for over the summer), Connecticut (maybe she likes New Haven), or Ohio (so she can always go home if D.C. doesn’t work out)—and then waive in to D.C. for the reasons I discussed above. I’d be shocked if more than 1 or 2 Yale grads (if any) take the D.C. exam in a typical year. I’m a Stanford alum, and after California and perhaps New York, D.C. was the most common post-graduation destination, yet I’m not aware of anyone sitting for the D.C. bar.The exam has not changed materially in difficulty since Hillary Clinton’s era. D.C. remains, by both reputation and statistics, one of the 5 or so toughest bar exams in the country. And affirmative action doesn’t have anything to do with the subject, states rarely alter the difficulty of bar exams, but when they do, it is typically because of long-term trends in supply or demand (too few/many people seeking admission). As a general matter, bar exams don’t change materially from year to year in terms of difficulty, as a license earned in 1985 should be reflective of the same competence as one earned in 2002 or 2016. There would be a serious problem for the profession if consumers of legal services connected a lawyer’s year of admission to their perceived capabilities as a lawyer, e.g., “everyone knows that lawyers admitted to the bar prior to 2008 are much smarter than post-’08 lawyers.”Here’s a list of topics covered by the exam: https://law.wisc.edu/academicenh.... The exam, like most, does test Constitutional law, although it is typically a limited component of the exam (also, like most).
How should a sole proprietorship set up a LLC in NY?
Years ago forming an LLC was a huge pain. You had to Google your secretary of state, navigate their horrendous websites to find the right forms, print them, fill them in, and mail it with a check all while praying that everything was done adequately. The alternative route was finding a lawyer to do it for you for $1500-$2000.Now, creating an LLC is much cheaper to set up in New York, but still a little burdensome. You just need to submit the right registration form (DOS-1336), abide by the publication requirements, and pay the pertinent fees associated with formation. However, New York is unique in that it also requires an operating agreement which delineates the rules/responsibilities of the members (even if you're just a single member LLC). Even if it's only you involved with the business, you should ideally sit with a lawyer and draft up the rights, duties, liabilities, and obligations particular to the LLC. Keep in mind that you don't have to file this with the Department of State as it is meant to be kept internally.Anyways, if you're looking for affordable price quotes to get your LLC done from an experienced group of startup lawyers then check out LawTrades. We use technology to make our legal services more cost-effective than traditional law firms.
If I want to work as a journalist or foreign correspondent for the New York Times, what should I do?
The answer to this partly depends on how young you are now, since journalism is a young person’s game, generally speaking.If you are still an undergraduate, work on your school newspaper, take journalism classes, but mainly study widely—widely enough to be able to pick up information across a broad range of disciplines—while focusing in on developing an understanding of a controlling narrative for the unfolding of history, of which journalism is always a first draft. So you need to know about science to be able to understand new developments, have a sense of the arts and forms of creative expression, and have a core understanding of the historical narrative of our species.After that, you can either take the academic route, which was only just beginning when I was a journalist in the early 1980s, or else take the entrepreneurial route, which is now far more accessible than it was back then because of the affordances of technology.If you are smart at academic learning and good at working for teachers within a structured context, then get a Masters in Journalism from Columbia or Missouri or one of the other top-notch schools. The J-school at Columbia is the feeding ground for the NYC pros like the NYT.The alternative, as an ABC producer who has covered wars and famines on three continents suggested to my students, is that you have all the tools you need in a smart-phone, amazing mobility, so the trick is to figure out a place—an emerging story—that is not so dangerous that you’ll just be killed, but powerful enough and emerging in a way that would make you one of the first people on the ground when things become newsworthy. Like being in Benghazi or Aleppo at the start of the so-called Arab Spring.If you are a really good journalist and demonstrate it on the ground, you can still find a pathway to the top, but you have to be willing to take real risks. The academic track is a safer and truer route these days. In a way that is part of the misfortune of journalism in this era.
What are some of the most misunderstood songs in history?
My fiancee recently pointed out Empire State of Mind, recorded by Alicia Keys and Jay-Z. She’s right. The popular image of this song contrasts with the lyrics about as badly as the more famous Born in the USA example.The song is great, by the way. Great rap, amazing vocals and keys by Alicia Keys, and soaring epic chorus that we’ve all heard a ton of times. And people tend to focus on the chorus, which sounds like (and I think really is) a celebration of the unique crucible that is New York City:In New York,Concrete jungle where dreams are made ofThere's nothin' you can't doNow you're in New YorkThese streets will make you feel brand newBig lights will inspire youLet's hear it for New York, New York, New YorkBut the thing is that the chorus is just a brief relief from the rest of what’s actually happening in the song. The rest of the song starts out happy and very quickly veers into a brutal depiction of how people get by in NYC — and how they deceive themselves into thinking they are happy, when they are just getting abused left and right.So we start out with Jay-Z telling us that while he may have started out as a drug dealer at 560 State Street in Brooklyn, today he’s living large:Yea, yea I'm out that Brooklyn, now I'm down in TribecaRight next to DeNiro, but I'll be hood foreverI'm the new Sinatra, and, since I made it hereI can make it anywhere, yea, they love me everywhereSounds great, right? then we get the first triumphant chorus, but when we return to the verse, it gets dark fast:Eight million stories, out there in it nakedCity is a pity, half of y'all won't make itAnd then we learn how people make it in the Naked City:City of sin, it's a pity on the whimGood girls gone bad, the city's filled with themMommy took a bus trip, now she got her bust outEverybody ride her, just like a bus routeDamn. And it’s not just the women:Came here for school, graduated to the high lifeBall players, rap stars, addicted to the limelightMDMA got you feelin' like a championThe city never sleeps, better slip you an AmbienMan. I do miss New York, though.
Which forms do I need to fill in order to file New York state taxes?
You must determine your New York State residency status. You need to answer these questions:Did you live in an on-campus apartment or an apartment or house off-campus in New York State in 2012?Did you maintain, or rent, the on-campus apartment or off-campus residence for at least 11 months in 2012?Were you physically present in New York State for at least 183 days in 2012?If the answers to all three questions are "Yes", and you were not a full-time undergraduate student (which as an F-1 OPT I assume you were not), you are a New York State resident for tax purposes. Otherwise you are a nonresident.You file Form IT-201, http://www.tax.ny.gov/pdf/curren..., if you are a resident of New York State, Form IT-203, http://www.tax.ny.gov/pdf/curren..., if you are not.
How do you fill in a State University of New York at Oswego transcript request?
In all USA institutes all aspiring foreigner students are required to submit their academic record of their native country, endorsed by the school or college in original and these documents shall be NOT be returned.If you are applying for pre-college / pre-university courses, you will submit your school records. If applying for post graduate courses then submit your marks list of your graduated course.Transcript = Marks list, academic records (certificates of class performance) these are the documents which you need to take from your college i.e. take duplicate mark sheets or take color photocopies & get it endorsed by your school or college, and submit it in YOUR school / college LOGO sealed envelope.Sometimes, they may not accept color photocopies also, in such case, go back to your school or college and take duplicate marks sheet / qualifying exam completion certificate get it endorsed by the school or college and then submit.Remember : Be careful = Do not submit your ORIGINALs for they will NOT BE RETURNED.
Get Form